Francophone Engagement Tools

Francophone Engagement Tools

Why Community Engagement?

Under the Local Health System Integration Act, each health service provider has to engage the community of diverse persons and entities in the area where it provides health services when developing plans and setting priorities for the delivery of health services.  

Community-based planning should include continuous measures of consultation and engagement between health service providers (HSP) and other health service providers and local stakeholders in order to encourage cooperation and partnerships among service providers and among various sectors of the community.

Across the province, people working in the areas of community-based planning, health promotion and healthy communities want to fully engage and work with all the people who live, work and play in our communities. The reality is that across the province many people doing this work do not speak French. But does that mean that they cannot meaningfully engage Francophones in their community work?

How the Réseau Can Help You?

To enable Francophones in Northern Ontario to take charge of their health, the Réseau developed the approach of the Carrefour santé. The Carrefours santé are a group of people in a community who come together to identify the needs of their community and find solutions.

There are Carrefours santé in the Northeast and the Northwest. It is also important to note that some communities have chosen to use existing tables or groups as a means of engaging with Francophones.

To meet with the Carrefour or table santé in your area or for networking opportunities with the Francophone community, contact the Planning and Community Engagement Officer in your area.

Resources

How to Engage Francophones… When You don’t Speak French – Across the province, people working in the areas of community-based planning, health promotion and healthy communities want to fully engage and work with all the people who live, work and play in our communities. The reality is that across the province many people doing this work do not speak French. But does that mean that they cannot meaningfully engage Francophones in their community work?